Proteomics Sponsored by Bio-Rad
The next generation of COVID-19 vaccines: Gallo on next steps
What will the next generation of COVID-19 vaccines look like? In the first of a two-part series, The Science Advisory Board spoke with pioneering virology researcher Dr. Robert Gallo to get his thoughts on what a next-generation COVID-19 vaccine might look like, and which candidates are in the running for marketing authorization. Read More
mRNA vaccines are successful for COVID-19. But what about cancer?
Advances in platform technology for the development of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines have led to the authorization of several COVID-19 vaccines. But scientists are also working on developing mRNA vaccines to protect against or treat other diseases, such as cancer. This includes a hydrogel-based RNA vaccine, the design of which is discussed in an article published in Nano Letters on February 1. Read More
Proteomics helps researchers pick the best anti-SARS-CoV-2 nanobodies
A new high-throughput proteomics-based strategy to identify tiny antibody fragments -- called nanobodies -- may provide an efficient and effective method for developing therapeutics against the deadly SARS-CoV-2 virus -- including variants. The findings were published in Cell Systems on February 15. Read More
Scientists identify missing molecular links to SARS-CoV-2, host interactions
Researchers have identified interactions between short viral proteins and receptors that facilitate the entry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus into a host. This evidence of molecular links, published in Science Signaling on February 12, may help scientists identify drugs that are highly effective at blocking the virus. Read More
Multiomics approach profiles molecular characteristics of glioblastoma
A team of more than 40 investigators has created a profile of the genes, proteins, infiltrating cells, and signaling pathways of the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma. The findings could lead to better patient care, according to the authors of a new study published February 11 in Cancer Cell. Read More
Researchers use modified CRISPR tool to manipulate the epigenome
Bioengineers have developed a new way to engineer the human epigenome (chemical changes in the DNA) using a modified CRISPR-Cas9 system to target and activate proteins in the chromosome. This research, published in Nature Communications on February 9, expands on synthetic genome tools. Read More
New synthetic biology approach may improve delivery of programmable medicines
Programmable medicines that can be controlled by synthetic genetic components are not yet a clinical reality. But synthetic components can now be reconfigured so they don't overwhelm host cells, moving the technology a step closer to clinical reality, according to new research published February 8 in Nature Communications. Read More
Deep-learning approach points the way to faster COVID-19 vaccines
A novel deep neural network can target the most promising multiepitope COVID-19 vaccine candidates in a matter of seconds. The new artificial intelligence framework, which was described in Scientific Reports on February 5, may give scientists an edge in the race against SARS-CoV-2 and its variants by reducing the time from vaccine design to clinical trials. Read More
New COVID-19 vaccine platforms emerge, are effective in preclinical models
Additional vaccine approaches are necessary to fight COVID-19. Two new vaccine candidates have demonstrated their effectiveness in animal models, and their potential clinical applications are described in two new research studies. Read More
Recurrent deletions help SARS-CoV-2 mutate to escape antibodies
Researchers have identified a pattern of deletions in the spike glycoprotein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that can prevent antibody binding, which is part of the body's immune response to a foreign virus. These deletions occur as a recurring pattern of evolution, according to a study published in Science on February 3. Read More
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