Proteomics
How the South African SARS-CoV-2 variant evades antibodies
Computer modeling has demonstrated that one of the three mutations of the South African SARS-CoV-2 variant reduces its ability to bind to human cells. The results, published recently in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, also suggest that the mutation may help it escape some therapeutic antibodies. Read More
New tool sheds light on transient protein interactions in cells
Researchers have developed a novel chemical tool for elucidating protein interaction networks within cells. The technique, details of which were published in Molecular Cell on April 23, allows for the visualization of protein-protein interactions. Read More
Naturally occurring molecule helps SARS-CoV-2 evade neutralizing antibodies
Researchers have identified naturally occurring molecules that are created from the breakdown of hemoglobin and block the binding of a subset of human antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. The discovery, published in Science Advances on April 22, may help explain why some COVID-19 patients can become severely ill despite having high levels of antibodies against the virus. Read More
X-ray crystallography identifies drugs to be repurposed for COVID-19
A new large-scale study indicates x-ray crystallography can be used to find drugs that could be repurposed to target the SARS-CoV-2 main protease. In addition to identifying 37 potential drug candidates, the study, published in Science on April 2, revealed a new binding site on the SARS-CoV-2 main protease to which drugs can bind. Read More
Hydrogen maps of SARS-CoV-2 main protease point to effective repurposed drugs
Scientists have used atomic maps of hydrogen atoms to determine that the SARS-CoV-2 main protease acts in unexpected ways when it comes into contact with a drug inhibitor. The research, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry on March 23, provides key insights for efforts to repurpose existing drugs to develop candidates for treating COVID-19. Read More
Stable spike protein makes main SARS-CoV-2 variant more infectious
A new study finds that the enhanced infectivity of the dominant G614 variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus largely results from the increased stability of its spike protein. Findings from the study were published in Science on March 16. Read More
SARS-CoV-2 mutation doesn't affect viral spread, but may limit therapies
As SARS-CoV-2 spreads around the globe, mutations of the virus are inevitable. An international team of researchers sought to define the effects of a specific receptor-binding motif mutation on viral fitness, clinical outcomes, and resistance to therapeutic antibodies. The findings of the study were published on January 28 in Cell. Read More
Passive vaccines with mAbs may be effective for COVID-19
Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from the blood of recovered COVID-19 patients -- known colloquially as "convalescent plasma" -- could be potentially useful as therapeutic and prophylactic agents for passive vaccination, assuming their administration does not trigger unwanted side effects. The findings of the new study were published in Cell on September 26. Read More
Antiviral molecules targeting SARS-CoV-2 main protease are potent inhibitors
New compounds targeting the SARS-CoV-2 main protease could be potent inhibitors of the coronavirus. Researchers tested various engineered molecules for antiviral activity in an article published in Science Translational Medicine on August 3. Read More
Researchers further define nonstructural protein targets of SARS-CoV-2
The crystal structure of nonstructural protein 16 of SARS-CoV-2, which plays a role in viral RNA capping to mimic host messenger RNA, reveals specific rational design targets that could be used to develop effective therapies against SARS-CoV-2 and other coronaviruses. The research was published in Nature Communications on July 24. Read More
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