Proteomics
New evidence shows SARS-CoV-2 mutations are not more transmissible
In direct contrast to previous research, researchers found that SARS-CoV-2 mutations are not tied to increased transmissibility in humans. The findings, published in Nature Communications on November 25 suggest that mutations such as D614G, while common, are neutral to viral evolution.  Discuss
Superspreader events drive global SARS-CoV-2 transmission
So-called "superspreader events" have been a major contributor to widespread transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to a new analysis of outbreaks in Austria. Researchers used deep viral genome sequencing to trace the evolution of the pandemic in the country and how the virus spread beyond its borders, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine on November 23.  Discuss
Why are children more resistant to SARS-CoV-2 infection?
Why do children seem to be more resistant to SARS-CoV-2 infection than adults? The answer may lie in the age-dependent presence of a key viral enzyme, transmembrane protease serine 2, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation on November 12.  Discuss
Improving the safety of gene therapies 2 different ways
Two groups of researchers have developed unique approaches to overcome the limitations of delivery of gene editing therapeutics. In a pair of new papers, researchers describe methods for more efficient and safe delivery of CRISPR components to targeted cells and tissues.  Discuss
Digital microfluidic technique connects cells to their environment
A new digital microfluidic technique allows researchers to connect physical cell properties with the molecular makeup of individual cells. This new approach, published in Nature Communications on November 11, will enable a deeper study of stem cells and other rare cell types for therapeutic development.  Discuss
Proteomic changes in cancer cells provide new drug insights
Large-scale profiling of protein changes in response to drug treatment in cancer cell lines has been demonstrated as a powerful tool to predict drug sensitivity, understand drug resistance, and identify optimal drug combinations. The analysis was published in Cancer Cell on November 5.  Discuss
Gene silencing target identified as possible leukemia treatment
Researchers have identified a molecule that permits growth of cancers such as leukemia by silencing certain host genes. The results, published in Nature Genetics on November 2, challenge the current understanding of epigenetic control during tumor development.  Discuss
Patient-specific airway stem cells developed to model lung diseases
Researchers have successfully created airway basal stem cells in vitro from induced pluripotent stem cells. These cells can be used to study acquired and genetic airway diseases, according to an article published in Cell Stem Cell on October 23.  Discuss
Researchers identify 'ancient' DNA weapons against cancer
Researchers have identified silent ancient DNA elements buried in the human genome that when "reactivated" can initiate an immune response toward cancer cells. They also identified a key enzyme, normally used by cancer cells to evade immune responses, that can be leveraged against them. The research was published in Nature on October 21.  Discuss
New method reclaims resolution of single-cell RNA-seq
A new approach to RNA sequencing can enable scientists to extract 10 times more information from a single cell, including gene expression and subtle differences between healthy and diseased cells. The study, published in Immunity on October 13, reveals the power of the improved Seq-Well method and provides evidence of its efficacy in five inflammatory skin diseases.  Discuss
Conferences
Festival of Genomics & Biodata
January 28-29, 2021
London, Greater London United Kingdom
Lab of the Future USA
May 11-12, 2021
Boston, Massachusetts United States
Conferences
Festival of Genomics & Biodata
January 28-29, 2021
London, Greater London United Kingdom
Lab of the Future USA
May 11-12, 2021
Boston, Massachusetts United States
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