Proteomics
Detecting SARS-CoV-2 in blood may be early indicator of severe disease
A blood test that measures SARS-CoV-2 RNA when patients are admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 symptoms can be a powerful diagnostic tool to predict how severe their disease will be, according to a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases on August 28. Patients without viral RNA in their blood have a good chance at rapid recovery, concluded researchers from Karolinska Institutet and Danderyd Hospital.  Discuss
Maps of natural killer cells offer insight into COVID-19 immune response
New research that sought to classify immune white blood cells, called natural killer cells, during COVID-19 infection revealed that certain cellular subtypes may contribute to the severity of disease progression, according to a recent Science Immunology article.  Discuss
Rare immune stem cells could lead to treatments for COVID-19, cancer
Rare stem cells that give rise to neutrophils in human bone marrow could offer a path to developing treatments for diseases that involve the white blood cells, according to a new article published in Immunity on August 18.  Discuss
SARS-CoV-2 causes immune paralysis in severe cases of COVID-19
The SARS-CoV-2 virus can cause the paralysis of key immune cells as the COVID-19 disease progresses, and this immune paralysis can be the difference between severe and mild cases of COVID-19, according to a study published in Science on August 11.  Discuss
Study analyzes how SARS-CoV-2 undermines immune defenses
A new research study used whole-genome sequencing to analyze the genetic profile of patients with the SARS-CoV-2 virus to gain more insight into how it turns the body's own immune system against itself. The findings could help researchers develop drugs to target the virus, according to an August 3 report in Nature Medicine.  Discuss
Life science instrumentation market adapts to COVID-19
To reflect the new realities of the analytical instrumentation market during the COVID-19 pandemic and in the subsequent pandemic-driven recession, Strategic Directions International, a sister company of The Science Advisory Board, has released its revised edition of the Global Assessment Report.  Discuss
SARS-CoV-2 rewires host proteins to promote infection
To successfully infect human cells, SARS-CoV-2 may hijack host proteins in target cells to promote its own replication. Researchers may be able to leverage this information to identify and recommend drugs, according to a June 29 Cell article.  Discuss
Some viruses may steal host genes to form beneficial hybrid proteins
Certain types of RNA viruses may be capable of using host RNA to expand their own genetic repertoire, according to a new study published in Cell on June 18. This mechanism may enable viruses to overcome the limitations of small genomes and more effectively infect host cells.  Discuss
NIH researchers investigate virulence of SARS-CoV-2 virus
What makes the SARS-CoV-2 virus so virulent? Researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) analyzed the genomics of the virus -- and compared it to other coronaviruses -- in a June 10 article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  Discuss
Study reveals genomic similarity between SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2
A new technique has shown that conserved genetic sequences between SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 may be important for their stability within host cells and ability to infect and replicate efficiently. The methodology was published in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications.  Discuss
Conferences
ESMO Virtual Congress 2020
September 14-29
Online
BioProcess International West
September 21-25
Online
BioProcess International
September 21-25
Online
ASGCT 2020 Policy Summit
September 23-25
Online
Conferences
ESMO Virtual Congress 2020
September 14-29
Online
BioProcess International West
September 21-25
Online
BioProcess International
September 21-25
Online
ASGCT 2020 Policy Summit
September 23-25
Online
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