Proteomics Sponsored by Bio-Rad
New open-access toolkit helps research labs study SARS-CoV-2
One of the most important factors in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic is large-scale scientific collaborations and knowledge sharing. One international group of researchers has made its simple, robust toolkit available to laboratories around the globe that are unaccustomed to working with coronaviruses. The details can be found in a PLOS Biology paper published on February 25. Read More
mRNA vaccines are successful for COVID-19. But what about cancer?
Advances in platform technology for the development of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines have led to the authorization of several COVID-19 vaccines. But scientists are also working on developing mRNA vaccines to protect against or treat other diseases, such as cancer. This includes a hydrogel-based RNA vaccine, the design of which is discussed in an article published in Nano Letters on February 1. Read More
2003 SARS-CoV antibodies may provide some protection from SARS-CoV-2
A new study shows that antibodies against the original 2003 SARS-CoV also react with the current SARS-CoV-2 strain, but only with limited effectiveness. The findings were published in Cell Reports on January 25. Read More
Cloaked nanoparticles may be a powerful therapy against coronaviruses
Nanoparticles cloaked with human cell membranes can attract and neutralize SARS-CoV-2, according to a new publication in Nano Letters on June 17. The process of binding to the virus hijacks its ability to replicate, making it a viable medical countermeasure against the virus. Read More
SARS-CoV-2 vaccine utilizing microneedle arrays appears in the literature
Within four weeks of the SARS-CoV-2 spike sequence becoming available, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine developed immunogens for a potential COVID-19 vaccine. The vaccine is delivered through a fingertip-sized patch, and it produces antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2 at quantities thought to be sufficient for neutralizing the virus, according to the April 2 EBioMedicine publication. Read More
Systems-based analysis helps researchers understand cell migration
An international team of researchers has developed a unique library to study the regulation of the cytoskeleton in space and time. The work, published in Nature Cell Biology on March 23, takes a systems-based approach to gain an overview of this process. Read More
New lung cancer biomarker could significantly improve patient outcomes
A new protein has been identified on tumor-derived extracellular vesicles that indicates if a lung tumor is likely to metastasize, according to research published in Science Advances on March 11. A minimally invasive biomarker test to catch cancer early could significantly improve patient outcomes. Read More
Small-molecule chaperones may reverse Alzheimer's symptoms in mice
A novel treatment for Alzheimer's disease involving the administration of pharmacological chaperones that prevent amyloid beta and tau tangles from forming in the brain may be possible, according to a new study published online on January 22 in Molecular Neurodegeneration. Read More
Scientists in the Lab: Featuring Lisa Mustachio
Continuing our feature series this January, ScienceBoard is happy to highlight the work of laboratory scientists, including Lisa Maria Mustachio, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Read More
Control of molecular 'doormen' in fat cells offers potential new obesity treatment
New treatment options for obesity could emerge from a study published in Nature Communications on January 10. Researchers from Yale University School of Medicine utilized cellular and molecular approaches to identify pathways to restore the healthy balance of fat cells. Read More
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