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A discovery of fungi – helping researchers identify new drugs
November 26, 2019 -- To address the need to identify new therapeutic targets, researchers at the Hubrecht Institute turned to fungi. The researchers tested secondary metabolites from over 10,000 fungi species and identified 34 biological active compounds with the potential to move to the next step of therapeutic drug development. The research was published in Scientific Reports on November 26. Read More
Designer DNA traps dengue virus
November 25, 2019 -- Researchers from Rensselear Polytechnic Institute have developed a new approach to trap the dengue virus, a close relative to the Zika virus, in the bloodstream using innovative nanotechnology. The technique was published in Nature Chemistry on November 25. Read More
New method reveals 3D DNA structure
November 22, 2019 -- The scientist who developed a new method of illuminating 3D genomic structures, called Dip-C, is awarded the SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists by the Science for Life Laboratory in Sweden and the journal Science. The research of the grand prize winner, Longzhi Tan, builds on the work of the Human Genome Project by developing an algorithm to capture diploid chromosome conformation. Read More
Data Science Vital to Large-Scale Cellular Studies
November 21, 2019 -- Data science as a discipline has become a central aspect of many commercial endeavors. A large range of distinct applications have adopted its approaches and techniques. Despite the major differences in many of these applications, some of the techniques can be transferred from old and established data-driven fields to new, completely separate data-intensive areas. For example, certain image analysis algorithms from astronomy can be applied in fields involving microscopy. Read More
New genetic risk factor discovered for Alzheimer's disease
November 21, 2019 -- A new genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) has been identified by researchers from the University of Kentucky. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Neuropathology & Experimental Neurology on November 21. Read More
New molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease identified
November 20, 2019 -- A group of researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered new molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease (PD) and subsequently determined how they impact the function of genes involved in the disease. This was accomplished using a complex statistical technique called multiscale gene network analysis (MGNA). The results were published in Nature Communications on November 20. Read More
Bacterial structures are critical to the development of new antibiotics
November 19, 2019 -- A research team from Cornell University have uncovered a unique regulatory mechanism unique to bacterial that may provide crucial insight for antibiotic targeting of pathogens. The work was published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology on November 18. Read More
Researchers use drug repurposing to identify new treatment for Metabolic Syndrome
November 18, 2019 -- A research team from the University of Trento find a novel method for using old drugs in new ways, specifically for Metabolic Syndrome. This revolutionary technique, published on November 18 in Nature Communications, uses a systems biology approach to investigate deregulated biological processes and identify drug repurposing candidates. Read More
New mechanism elucidated for essential molecule-sorting organelle
November 15, 2019 -- A new study published in Nature Communications on November 15 suggests a new mechanism by which vesicles are transported out of the Golgi apparatus for the formation and maintenance of endosomes. The work, conducted by researchers from Tokyo University of Science and the Institute of Science and Technology in Austria, changes the paradigm of how materials are sorted and distributed once they enter cells. Read More
Genomic breakthrough in malaria research
November 15, 2019 -- An international consortium of researchers from the Institute of Cell Biology at the University of Bern and Umeå University in Sweden conducted a genome-wide deletion study to determine genes that are required for malaria parasite transmission. The results were presented in Cell on November 14. Read More
Single-molecule resolution technique allows researchers to quantify secondary transport
November 14, 2019 -- St. Jude researchers from Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute present new evidence about the mechanics of how secondary active transporter proteins function. This report is published in Nature on November 13. Read More
New imaging technique gains an advantage with deep-learning software
November 13, 2019 -- Researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute developed a new technique that applies deep learning to quantify images generated from fluorescence lifetime imaging. Details of the deep neural network they developed, called FLI-Net, are described in the November 12 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read More
Is there a reproducibility problem with RNA-seq data?
November 12, 2019 -- Modern day technology has allowed scientists to analyze highly complex genomic data sets. However, with this comes increased challenges associated with reproducibility and misinterpretation of results from massive data sets. One such example, RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), provides the ability to simultaneously measure gene expression levels of all genes in a sample in a single test. Read More
Targeted therapies can now be more effective with the use of ultrasound technology
November 12, 2019 -- Biomedical engineers from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles propose a new method to direct targeted drug release in the body using acoustics. The findings describing how they manipulated ultrasonic waves were published in Applied Physics Letters on November 12, 2019. Read More
Novel mitochondrial phenomenon helps explains early neurodegeneration
November 8, 2019 -- Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine scientists discovered a novel pathway that leads to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study was published in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience on November 7. The pathway could explain the development of early stages of neurodegeneration which affects voluntary muscle movement such as walking and talking. Read More