Cancer & Disease Research
Recurrent deletions help SARS-CoV-2 mutate to escape antibodies
Researchers have identified a pattern of deletions in the spike glycoprotein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that can prevent antibody binding, which is part of the body's immune response to a foreign virus. These deletions occur as a recurring pattern of evolution, according to a study published in Science on February 3. Read More
Machine learning improves COVID-19 drug repurposing efforts
A novel machine-learning technique leverages gene expression data to improve drug repurposing and can even predict interactions between drug candidates and targets based on incomplete data. The framework, which was described in Nature Machine Learning on February 1, was applied to drug repurposing for COVID-19 to generate potential lead compounds in line with clinical evidence. Read More
Acute SARS-CoV-2 infection elicits distinct antibody, T-cell responses
An analysis of antibody and T-cell responses during the entire timeline of SARS-CoV-2 infection reveals the different ways the immune system responds to the virus in the early phases of COVID-19 disease. The results, published in Cell Reports on January 21, suggest that T-cell responses may be important for controlling infection while antibodies provide longer protection. Read More
Protein biosensors show promise for SARS-CoV-2 testing
Scientists have developed biosensors to detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins and antibodies in simulated nasal fluids and human sera, according to a study published in Nature on January 27. The approach promises to be less costly and time-consuming than current COVID-19 testing methods. Read More
SARS-CoV-2 mutation doesn't affect viral spread, but may limit therapies
As SARS-CoV-2 spreads around the globe, mutations of the virus are inevitable. An international team of researchers sought to define the effects of a specific receptor-binding motif mutation on viral fitness, clinical outcomes, and resistance to therapeutic antibodies. The findings of the study were published on January 28 in Cell. Read More
Global evidence suggests COVID-19 could be seasonal
As the world enters year two of the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests that seasonality, including temperature and location, could be a factor in the spread of infections with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to an analysis published in Evolutionary Bioinformatics on January 26. Read More
Preclinical lung imaging offers effective evaluation of drug candidates
Drug discovery and development are arduous and costly endeavors, with nine in 10 drug candidates failing to gain approval. Preclinical imaging can help pharmaceutical companies more effectively evaluate drug candidates, in particular for respiratory diseases. Read More
2003 SARS-CoV antibodies may provide some protection from SARS-CoV-2
A new study shows that antibodies against the original 2003 SARS-CoV also react with the current SARS-CoV-2 strain, but only with limited effectiveness. The findings were published in Cell Reports on January 25. Read More
Novel microscopy method unlocks clues to nanomedicine interactions
A new mixed microscopy method has led to a better understanding of the interactions of proteins in the body with nanoparticles used for biotherapeutic applications. The findings, published in Nature Communications on January 25, suggest nonuniform interactions and errors that may occur in existing analytical techniques. Read More
Which states are safest from COVID-19?
Safety during the COVID-19 pandemic is a priority to getting back to normal activities such as work and shopping. As more individuals get vaccinated, more states will lift COVID-19-related restrictions. Read More
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