Cancer & Disease Research Sponsored by Beckman Coulter
Gene silencing target identified as possible leukemia treatment
Researchers have identified a molecule that permits growth of cancers such as leukemia by silencing certain host genes. The results, published in Nature Genetics on November 2, challenge the current understanding of epigenetic control during tumor development.  Discuss
Are SARS-CoV-2 mutations more contagious than the original virus?
The SARS-CoV-2 virus has accumulated genetic mutations that may make it more contagious and more easily spread in metropolitan communities, according to researchers who analyzed over 5,000 COVID-19 patient samples in the Houston area. They published their results in mBio on October 30.  Discuss
Effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines will rely on public trust
No matter how effective upcoming COVID-19 vaccines are, their ultimate success in combating the pandemic will depend on how much the public trusts the safety and efficacy of the products. That's according to a panel of physicians and scientists who discussed COVID-19 vaccine trials in a briefing on October 29.  Discuss
Most antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 are strong and long-lasting
How long does the immune response last in patients with the SARS-CoV-2 virus? This has been a key question in shaping the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and a new report published in Science on October 28 offers some good news.  Discuss
New model could improve vaccine, immunotherapy design
A new model used to predict the outcomes of pathogen detection systems as a function of innate immunity may lead to more effective cancer immunotherapies and vaccines against existing and novel pathogens, according to results published in Cell Systems on October 27.  Discuss
Patient-specific airway stem cells developed to model lung diseases
Researchers have successfully created airway basal stem cells in vitro from induced pluripotent stem cells. These cells can be used to study acquired and genetic airway diseases, according to an article published in Cell Stem Cell on October 23.  Discuss
Who should get the 1st COVID-19 vaccines?
Once a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to be administered to the public, who should receive it first, given that its supply will be initially limited? A new perspective published in Science on October 21 fleshes out different COVID-19 vaccine distribution strategies that would ensure optimal protection from the disease under conditions of vaccine scarcity.  Discuss
Researchers identify 'ancient' DNA weapons against cancer
Researchers have identified silent ancient DNA elements buried in the human genome that when "reactivated" can initiate an immune response toward cancer cells. They also identified a key enzyme, normally used by cancer cells to evade immune responses, that can be leveraged against them. The research was published in Nature on October 21.  Discuss
Researchers discover important 2nd SARS-CoV-2 receptor
Researchers have identified a second receptor that might be important in SARS-CoV-2 infectivity, according to a new report published in Science on October 20. This cofactor helps facilitate virus-host cell interactions in cells with low levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, the primary receptor on host cells, and might explain the increased pathogenicity of SARS-CoV-2.  Discuss
Validating drug repurposing workflows may help identify new COVID-19 treatments
A research team has strengthened COVID-19 drug repurposing workflows through independent in vitro validation followed by clinical pharmacology data assessments, with the goal of launching clinical studies of currently approved drugs. The protocol was published in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science on October 14.  Discuss
Conferences
Festival of Genomics & Biodata
January 28-29, 2021
London, Greater London United Kingdom
Lab of the Future USA
May 11-12, 2021
Boston, Massachusetts United States
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