Cancer & Disease Research
Single-cell RNAseq differentiates cancer stem cells from healthy stem cells
Researchers have described a new single-cell RNA-sequencing approach, leveraging genomic and mitochondrial DNA mutations, that has the potential to differentiate normal stem cells from cancer stem cells. The article detailing the approach was published in Nature Communications on March 1. Read More
FDA committee gives nod to Janssen COVID-19 vaccine
A single-shot COVID-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson's Janssen Biotech subsidiary has received a positive recommendation from a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee. Should the FDA grant the product emergency use authorization, the vaccine candidate will become the third to be made available in the U.S. Read More
Recurrent deletions help SARS-CoV-2 mutate to escape antibodies
Researchers have identified a pattern of deletions in the spike glycoprotein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that can prevent antibody binding, which is part of the body's immune response to a foreign virus. These deletions occur as a recurring pattern of evolution, according to a study published in Science on February 3. Read More
Acute SARS-CoV-2 infection elicits distinct antibody, T-cell responses
An analysis of antibody and T-cell responses during the entire timeline of SARS-CoV-2 infection reveals the different ways the immune system responds to the virus in the early phases of COVID-19 disease. The results, published in Cell Reports on January 21, suggest that T-cell responses may be important for controlling infection while antibodies provide longer protection. Read More
Protein biosensors show promise for SARS-CoV-2 testing
Scientists have developed biosensors to detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins and antibodies in simulated nasal fluids and human sera, according to a study published in Nature on January 27. The approach promises to be less costly and time-consuming than current COVID-19 testing methods. Read More
SARS-CoV-2 mutation doesn't affect viral spread, but may limit therapies
As SARS-CoV-2 spreads around the globe, mutations of the virus are inevitable. An international team of researchers sought to define the effects of a specific receptor-binding motif mutation on viral fitness, clinical outcomes, and resistance to therapeutic antibodies. The findings of the study were published on January 28 in Cell. Read More
Global evidence suggests COVID-19 could be seasonal
As the world enters year two of the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests that seasonality, including temperature and location, could be a factor in the spread of infections with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to an analysis published in Evolutionary Bioinformatics on January 26. Read More
Novel microscopy method unlocks clues to nanomedicine interactions
A new mixed microscopy method has led to a better understanding of the interactions of proteins in the body with nanoparticles used for biotherapeutic applications. The findings, published in Nature Communications on January 25, suggest nonuniform interactions and errors that may occur in existing analytical techniques. Read More
Can antibodies to seasonal coronaviruses protect against SARS-CoV-2?
COVID-19 is not the world's first exposure to a coronavirus. With at least six previous exposures to various types of coronaviruses, researchers are exploring if antibodies created during earlier infection with coronaviruses can help to fight off SARS-CoV-2 infection. The findings of the study were published in Cell Reports Medicine on January 19. Read More
How can biopharma innovation be maintained after COVID-19?
Will the speed of biotech innovation seen during the COVID-19 pandemic be maintained going forward, or will the market revert to the status quo? A panel of speakers discussed these questions during a January 7 advance session of the Biotech Showcase, a virtual event to be held January 11-15. Read More
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