Cancer & Disease Research
Scientists visualize viruses in motion using advanced electron microscopy
Advanced electron microscopy has enabled researchers to visualize how human viruses move in high resolution in a near-native environment. The visualization technique, published in Advanced Materials on July 24, could lead to an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms of vaccines and therapeutics. Read More
FDA issues EUA for monoclonal antibody for treatment of hospitalized COVID-19 patients
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) to Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, for tocilizumab (Actemra) for the treatment of hospitalized adults and pediatric patients. Read More
Collaboration targets new treatments for brain diseases
Developing more effective methods to deliver drugs across the blood-brain barrier is the goal of a new collaboration being led by the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University. Read More
Leveraging past flu pandemics helps build universal flu vaccine
Targeting regions of the influenza virus that do not often change may be an effective strategy for developing next-generation universal flu vaccines, according to new research published in Science Translational Medicine on June 2. Researchers interrogated immune responses from the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic to determine which targets to include in new vaccines. Read More
Hope for next-gen COVID-19 vaccines may rest in an unexpected region of the virus
Researchers further elucidated how antibodies produced in people who effectively fight off SARS-CoV-2 work to neutralize the part of the virus responsible for causing infection. The study, published in Science on May 4, describes how antibodies targeting sections of the virus outside of the receptor-binding domain may be useful in the development of vaccines and therapies. Read More
How the South African SARS-CoV-2 variant evades antibodies
Computer modeling has demonstrated that one of the three mutations of the South African SARS-CoV-2 variant reduces its ability to bind to human cells. The results, published recently in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, also suggest that the mutation may help it escape some therapeutic antibodies. Read More
Naturally occurring molecule helps SARS-CoV-2 evade neutralizing antibodies
Researchers have identified naturally occurring molecules that are created from the breakdown of hemoglobin and block the binding of a subset of human antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. The discovery, published in Science Advances on April 22, may help explain why some COVID-19 patients can become severely ill despite having high levels of antibodies against the virus. Read More
NIH adds long-acting antibody COVID-19 therapy to ACTIV-3 master protocol
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has begun a new arm of its master protocol, the Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines 3 (ACTIV-3) study, which evaluates the safety and efficacy of an investigational long-acting antibody combination for the treatment of patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Read More
SARS-CoV-2 mutation doesn't affect viral spread, but may limit therapies
As SARS-CoV-2 spreads around the globe, mutations of the virus are inevitable. An international team of researchers sought to define the effects of a specific receptor-binding motif mutation on viral fitness, clinical outcomes, and resistance to therapeutic antibodies. The findings of the study were published on January 28 in Cell. Read More
2003 SARS-CoV antibodies may provide some protection from SARS-CoV-2
A new study shows that antibodies against the original 2003 SARS-CoV also react with the current SARS-CoV-2 strain, but only with limited effectiveness. The findings were published in Cell Reports on January 25. Read More
Conferences
Building Biology in 3D Hybrid Symposium
October 26-27
La Jolla, California United States
Northeast Regional Laboratory Staff and Core Directors (NERLSCD) 2021
November 3-5
Portsmouth, New Hampshire United States
CPhI Worldwide 2021
November 9-11
Milan, Lombardia Italy
Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) Annual Meeting
November 10-14
Washington, DC, District of Columbia United States
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