Cancer & Disease Research Sponsored by Beckman Coulter
Most antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 are strong and long-lasting
How long does the immune response last in patients with the SARS-CoV-2 virus? This has been a key question in shaping the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and a new report published in Science on October 28 offers some good news.  Discuss
Researchers discover important 2nd SARS-CoV-2 receptor
Researchers have identified a second receptor that might be important in SARS-CoV-2 infectivity, according to a new report published in Science on October 20. This cofactor helps facilitate virus-host cell interactions in cells with low levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, the primary receptor on host cells, and might explain the increased pathogenicity of SARS-CoV-2.  Discuss
Validating drug repurposing workflows may help identify new COVID-19 treatments
A research team has strengthened COVID-19 drug repurposing workflows through independent in vitro validation followed by clinical pharmacology data assessments, with the goal of launching clinical studies of currently approved drugs. The protocol was published in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science on October 14.  Discuss
How are asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers different from symptomatic patients?
A new retrospective study reveals that asymptomatic COVID-19 patients may have higher levels of lymphocytes, specifically T cells, compared to symptomatic COVID-19 patients despite carrying similar viral loads. The results were published in mSphere on October 7.  Discuss
Can SARS-CoV antibodies be used to develop universal coronavirus vaccines?
Can antibodies developed against SARS-CoV during the 2003 outbreak be used to prevent infection by SARS-CoV-2? In an October 9 study published in Science Advances, researchers analyzed precious serum collected from convalescent SARS-CoV patients to find out.  Discuss
Long-lasting IgG antibodies found in blood and saliva of COVID-19 patients
Researchers have discovered that immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 virus are longer lasting in the blood and saliva of COVID-19 patients compared to the relatively short-lived IgM and IgA responses. The finding, presented in a pair of studies published in Science Immunology on October 8, suggests that IgG antibodies could be a promising target to detect and evaluate immune responses to the virus.  Discuss
Will mutation of the SARS-CoV-2 virus affect vaccine effectiveness?
What impact will mutation of the SARS-CoV-2 virus have on the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines that are in development? In a new study published in NPJ Vaccines on October 8, Australian researchers say they believe that a recent change in the genetic material of the virus shouldn't reduce the effectiveness of vaccines coming to market.  Discuss
FDA issues guidance on submitting EUA requests for COVID-19 vaccines
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on October 6 issued a new guidance with recommendations for developers of COVID-19 vaccines regarding the scientific data and information that would be required to support emergency use authorization (EUA) for the products.  Discuss
Many mammals may be at high risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection
Despite broad interest in determining the origin of SARS-CoV-2 in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, the existence of an intermediate host between the source of the virus in bats and humans remains unknown. A study published in Scientific Reports on October 5 provides evidence that 26 species of mammals that are regularly in contact with humans may be susceptible to infection.  Discuss
Neanderthal heritage may be a risk factor for COVID-19
A new study shows that a genetic risk factor inherited from Neanderthal heritage is associated with two times greater risk of serious disease and death from COVID-19. The study was published in Nature on September 30.  Discuss
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