Cancer & Disease Research Sponsored by Beckman Coulter
Fluorescent molecular probe used to detect temperature inside individual cells
Modified biocompatible molecular rotor, termed boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY), has been shown to detect temperatures inside single cells. Researchers at Rice University led by chemist Angel Martí published the technique in the Journal of Physical Chemistry B.  Discuss
Oncogene identified as a therapeutic target for liver cancer
The function of an enzyme that is highly expressed in many cancers has been revealed to regulate key pathways in cancer metabolic adaptation. Researchers at the Georgia Cancer Center and Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University published their findings in Hepatology.  Discuss
New drug target identified for common brain cancer
Research led by the Cleveland Clinic has identified a potential new therapy in the treatment of glioblastoma. An article published in Cancer Discovery on August 21, identifies FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2), as a novel drug target for glioblastoma, the most common primary malignant brain tumor.  Discuss
Biologically active molecules in coal are found to have antiviral properties against tick-borne encephalitis
Scientists from Russia demonstrated in a Scientific Reports article published on August 19, that biologically active molecular components of substances extracted from coal, humic substances, have antiviral properties. A novel approach to identify these molecules determined that these molecules inhibit the reproduction of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), which causes clinically relevant human viral infectious disease.  Discuss
The Parkinson’s Foundation launches large-scale genetic study, aiming to improve patient care and speed clinical trials
More than 10 million people worldwide are currently living with Parkinson’s disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder that impacts the dopamine-producing neurons in the brain. Scientists do not know exactly what causes PD, but they believe it is a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Nearly 10% to 15% of all PD cases are caused by genetic mutations. A new study aims to understand how the disease develops and how it can be treated or cured. This study, PD GENEration: Mapping the Future of Parkinson’s Disease is currently being conducted by the Parkinson’s Foundation.  Discuss
Detecting HPV in women is improved with the aid of a new molecular approach
A new technique called HPV RNA-Seq can provide a second-line test in HPV-positive patients to reduce unnecessary colposcopies and even be used as a two-in-one test combining HPV typing with triage capabilities. Researchers from Institut Pasteur and the Pathogen Discovery Laboratory in Paris, France published their findings in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics on August 12, 2019.  Discuss
Thermally stable TB vaccine may now be possible thanks to an innovative new process
Researchers at the University of Bath have developed a process that protects vaccines from heat damage by trapping them in silica cages. The results were published in Scientific Reports on August 8, 2019. Using a leading candidate in the development on new vaccines, Ag85b in conjunction with adjuvant Sbi-Ag85b, thermal stability of tested using a novel process called ensilication.  Discuss
A novel approach to using CRISPR: curing cystic fibrosis
Researchers are finding innovative ways to utilize CRISPR technology to permanently cure diseases, in this case, cystic fibrosis. A collaboration between the University of Trento in Italy and KU Leuven in Belgium, funded by Fondazione ricerca fibrosi cistica led to the publication of a new study in Nature Communications on August 7, 2019.  Discuss
New immunotherapy moves further into clinical testing with promising results
Success in international clinical trials leads to U.S. based research organizations beginning phase I/II clinical trials. If this form of immunotherapy is successful and deemed safe, then it could save the lives of liver cancer patients across the world.  Discuss
Visualizing big data in the life sciences gets an upgrade with new software
A new software developed by researchers at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) uses algorithms to reconstruct and scale data acquired by light-sheet microscopy that renders a supercomputer unnecessary. Light microscopy techniques provide extremely detailed information but result in terabytes of data which is nearly impossible for scientists to process. MDC researchers are helping make sense of this data.  Discuss
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