Proteomics
Does SARS-CoV-2 use host defenses to infect susceptible cells?
A new study pinpoints the most likely cell types that SARS-CoV-2 infects. Unexpectedly, the study indicates that one of the body's main defenses against viral infections may actually help the virus infect susceptible cells. The findings were published on April 21 in Cell.  Discuss
Major class of probiotics gets new taxonomy
A new paper published in the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology proposes major changes to the classification and naming of Lactobacillus probiotics based on new information gained by modern DNA analysis tools.  Discuss
Scientists use bioinformatics to investigate origin of SARS-CoV-2
While many scientists urgently work toward developing successful therapies to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, some are looking in the opposite direction: to where SARS-CoV-2 came from. A new report published in the Journal of Proteome Research suggests that while bats are a likely natural reservoir, an intermediate host is probable.  Discuss
Shortage of RNA extraction kits threatens coronavirus testing
The weak link in the U.S. response to diagnostic testing for the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 could be a shortage of RNA extraction kits. Fortunately, suppliers of RNA purification kits are working overtime to get more kits into circulation, according to Alice Kan of Strategic Directions International.  Discuss
Artificial intelligence helps researchers find new antibiotics
To address antibiotic resistance, researchers have developed a machine-learning approach that can search millions of known chemicals to find new potential antimicrobial compounds. This research, published in Cell on February 20, uncovered several promising antibiotic candidates that will move into clinical testing.  Discuss
Brain's immune system blocks blood immune cells from healing spinal injuries
Molecular and computational analysis of immune responses in the central nervous system reveals that the brain's immune system may prevent blood immune cells from entering a lesion site after injury. The research, published online in Science Advances on January 15, may offer new avenues to treat certain neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and spinal cord injury.  Discuss
Nanoparticles eat cardiovascular plaques from the inside out
Scientists have engineered a nanoparticle that eats plaques associated with cardiovascular disease -- from the inside out. This Trojan horse technology could offer a new therapeutic option for the treatment of atherosclerosis, according to a study published in Nature Nanotechnology on January 27.  Discuss
Scientists learn how lactate contributes to cancer formation
Previously considered a waste product of metabolism, lactate may play a crucial role in cancer growth, according to a study published in Frontiers in Oncology on January 14. Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus explored how lactate affects transcription of oncogenes in breast cancer cells.  Discuss
Scientists in the Lab: Featuring Lisa Mustachio
Continuing our feature series this January, ScienceBoard is happy to highlight the work of laboratory scientists, including Lisa Maria Mustachio, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at MD Anderson Cancer Center.  Discuss
Dietary probiotics show potential to reverse Parkinson's symptoms
Roundworms that were fed a commercially available dietary probiotic showed less buildup of proteins that form during the progression of Parkinson's disease in a new study, published in Cell Reports on January 14. The finding provides further evidence of a link between the gut microbiome and brain function.  Discuss
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