Proteomics
Control of molecular 'doormen' in fat cells offers potential new obesity treatment
New treatment options for obesity could emerge from a study published in Nature Communications on January 10. Researchers from Yale University School of Medicine utilized cellular and molecular approaches to identify pathways to restore the healthy balance of fat cells.  Discuss
Scientists in the Lab: Featuring Rebecca Fleeman
This month, ScienceBoard is featuring scientists in the laboratory to celebrate their important contributions to the scientific community. We are excited to introduce our first featured scientist of this month, Rebecca Fleeman of Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, PA.  Discuss
Improving melanoma immunotherapies by regulating Treg proliferation
A new pathway to regulating anti-tumor immunity and increasing the effectiveness of PD-1 therapies was identified by scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. The results were published in Nature Communications on January 7.  Discuss
Novel strategy for studying mitoribosomal and mitochondrial impact on disease
Researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new experimental tool for studying mitochondrial protein synthesis in vivo. This research is presented in the October 5 issue of Cell Reports.  Discuss
Immune cells shown to kill MRSA before it enters the body
Neutrophils could be responsible for controlling bacterial numbers of an antibiotic-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human skin before the bacteria get a chance to invade, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in Cell Reports on October 29.  Discuss
Study shows that Huntington's disease can be slowed by modifying brain cells
A new study led by researchers at UCLA published in Science Translational Medicine on October 16 found that Huntington's disease (HD) damages astrocytes at the early stages of the disease, contributing to neuropsychiatric symptoms.  Discuss
Success of immunotherapies increased in cancer patients through co-treatment with monoclonal antibodies
A new approach provides evidence that it is possible to break down the protective wall surrounding tumor cells, therefore making immunotherapies more effective in patients with a variety of cancers. This research, funded by Cancer Research UK, was published in the EBioMedicine on August 25th.  Discuss
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