Proteomics
Horseshoe crab 'farming' preserves species, makes blood test possible
Researchers have developed a new aquaculture-based method to harvest immune cells from horseshoe crabs that preserves the crustaceans while also creating the potential for new clinical applications, like testing blood for sepsis, according to a study published in Frontiers in Marine Science on April 1.  Discuss
Scientists alter cell function with genetic engineering, polymer science
A new method called genetically targeted chemical assembly (GTCA) has demonstrated the ability to build artificial structures within the body to carry out unique functions. The research, presented in the latest edition of Science, provides compelling evidence for GTCA's ability to modify cell function with bioengineering tools.  Discuss
Systems-based analysis helps researchers understand cell migration
An international team of researchers has developed a unique library to study the regulation of the cytoskeleton in space and time. The work, published in Nature Cell Biology on March 23, takes a systems-based approach to gain an overview of this process.  Discuss
New machinery digests toxic proteins to protect DNA replication
Researchers have identified molecular machinery that helps repair damaged DNA that occurs during DNA replication and transcription. This work, published in Nature Communications on March 9, reveals how specific enzymes "eat" or break down proteins that cause broken DNA.  Discuss
Inflammatory attack comes from an unexpected source in rheumatoid arthritis
Researchers have pinpointed immune cells called natural killer cells as an unexpected source of inflammatory proteins that contribute to rheumatoid arthritis. The research was published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine on February 25.  Discuss
3D model of human intestines helps simulate leaky gut condition
Researchers are using 3D models of human intestines to simulate leaky gut conditions -- in which microbes and molecules seep out of the intestines, eliciting an immune response. The research, published in Life Science Alliance on February 10, will help identify biomarkers for leaky gut for improved diagnostics and treatment development.  Discuss
Microscopy with fluorescent tags gives high-def view of diabetes-related proteins
Leveraging the power of new imaging techniques, scientists are using unique fluorescent tags in combination with superresolution microscopy to gain novel insights into a receptor that plays a key role in controlling blood sugar levels. These insights will open the door to improved treatment options for type 2 diabetes.  Discuss
New study offers hope for short-circuiting KRAS-driven lung cancers
The protein kinase p38α has been identified as a key element supporting KRAS-driven lung cancers, so inhibiting the protein has potential as a target for the treatment of certain lung cancers. An international group of researchers used genetic mouse models with the KRAS mutation to observe how p38α inhibition reduces tumor growth. The work was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on January 22.  Discuss
Small-molecule chaperones may reverse Alzheimer's symptoms in mice
A novel treatment for Alzheimer's disease involving the administration of pharmacological chaperones that prevent amyloid beta and tau tangles from forming in the brain may be possible, according to a new study published online on January 22 in Molecular Neurodegeneration.  Discuss
Dietary probiotics show potential to reverse Parkinson's symptoms
Roundworms that were fed a commercially available dietary probiotic showed less buildup of proteins that form during the progression of Parkinson's disease in a new study, published in Cell Reports on January 14. The finding provides further evidence of a link between the gut microbiome and brain function.  Discuss
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