Cell Biology
Research sheds light on how bacteria 'take one for the team'
It's already known that bacteria under assault by phages can occasionally program themselves to die before they become infected. But a pair of new papers published January 10 in Molecular Cell sheds more light on the process by which bacteria "take one for the team." The findings could provide new avenues in the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.  Discuss
Designer DNA traps dengue virus
Researchers from Rensselear Polytechnic Institute have developed a new approach to trap the dengue virus, a close relative to the Zika virus, in the bloodstream using innovative nanotechnology. The technique was published in Nature Chemistry on November 25.  Discuss
New CRISPR Cas13 system offers powerful antiviral protection
A first-of-its-kind study conducted by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard demonstrates that Cas13, a class 2 CRISPR system, can be used as an antiviral in cultured human cells. The research, published in Molecular Cell on October 10, suggests that the RNA-cutting enzyme can be programmed to detect and destroy RNA-based viruses.  Discuss
Driven by nanotech and other micro technologies electron microscopy market continues to grow
According to a new report from Strategic Directions International (SDI), the total market for electron microscopy instrumentation was in excess of $2.5 billion in 2018 and is expected to reach nearly $3.4 billion by 2023.  Discuss
Forward-oriented gene therapy improves treatment for sickle cell disease
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have developed a new and improved viral vector that is up to 10 times more efficient at incorporating corrective genes into bone marrow stem cells than conventional treatments. The work was published in Nature Communications on October 2, and was supported by the National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the NIH.  Discuss
Viral geometry mystery solved, or at least they have a theory
A new theory, published in Nature Communications on September 27, accurately predicts the positions of proteins within icosahedral (twenty-sided) protein containers of viruses. Researchers at the University of York in the UK and San Diego State University in the US state that this discovery revolutionizes scientific understanding of how viruses form, evolve and infect hosts.
New synthetic vaccine fights infectious disease with assistance from the data cloud
A new synthetic vaccine developed by researchers at the University of Bristol and the French National Centre for Scientific Research can be stored at warmer temperatures due to an engineered scaffold design. The details of the Chikungunya vaccine candidate are published in Science Advances on September 25.  Discuss
Biologically active molecules in coal are found to have antiviral properties against tick-borne encephalitis
Scientists from Russia demonstrated in a Scientific Reports article published on August 19, that biologically active molecular components of substances extracted from coal, humic substances, have antiviral properties. A novel approach to identify these molecules determined that these molecules inhibit the reproduction of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), which causes clinically relevant human viral infectious disease.  Discuss
Detecting HPV in women is improved with the aid of a new molecular approach
A new technique called HPV RNA-Seq can provide a second-line test in HPV-positive patients to reduce unnecessary colposcopies and even be used as a two-in-one test combining HPV typing with triage capabilities. Researchers from Institut Pasteur and the Pathogen Discovery Laboratory in Paris, France published their findings in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics on August 12, 2019.  Discuss
Structure-based vaccine design may help save the lives of infants and children
A new experimental vaccine, utilizing structure-based design, shows promise in a phase I clinical trial. The vaccine will protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of infectious disease deaths in infants. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin published findings on Aug 2, 2019 in Science stating that one dose elicited increases in RSV-neutralizing antibodies over several months.  Discuss
Conferences
Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS) 2020
January 25-29
San Diego, California United States
American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Biothreats
January 28-30
Arlington, Virginia United States
Festival of Genomics 2020
January 29-30
London, Greater London United Kingdom
Medlab Middle East
February 3-6
Dubai, Dubai United Arab Emirates
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