Cell Biology
Scientists use bacteria to build advanced synthetic cells with lifelike functionality
Researchers have used bacteria to build complex synthetic cells using a living material assembly process, advancing efforts to create protocells that mimic the earliest stages and functionality of cellular life. Read More
Stanford scientists create synthetic microbiome
Stanford University researchers built a complex and well-defined synthetic microbiome with 100 bacterial species that they successfully transplanted into mice. The creation of the synthetic microbiome means the scientists will be able to add, remove, and edit individual species so they may better comprehend the links between gut microbiome and health. Read More
Lipid in cell membrane of gut bacterium linked to effects on immunity
Researchers have found a lipid in the cell membrane of Akkermansia muciniphila that is responsible for the effect of a gut-resident bacterium on immune processes, with the potential to develop drugs that fight disease by piggybacking on the molecular mechanism. Read More
Scientists discover biomarkers associated with acute, chronic phases of TBI
Arizona State University scientists have provided some of the first detailed view of the molecular and cellular mechanisms behind traumatic brain injury (TBI) as the condition progresses from the acute to the chronic phase. Read More
Berkeley Lab offers CRAGE kit for genome engineering
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is offering a trial kit for its chassis-independent, recombinase-assisted, genome engineering (CRAGE) tool. Read More
Bioengineered peptide combats antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Researchers have engineered a bioinspired molecule that was highly effective in clearing infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains in a mouse model, according to a paper published in Scientific Reports on December 6. But there's a twist: The molecule doesn't act like an antibiotic. Read More
Researchers figure out how the immune system sparks cell death
Immunologists have discovered how the innate immune system launches a multifaceted attack against invaders through the use of multiple immune sensors. The work was published in Nature on September 1. Read More
Alternative gene therapies could be effective in treating some rare diseases
Bacteria-mediated genetic transfer has emerged as an alternative gene therapy (AGT) for the treatment of some rare diseases, such as phenylketonuria (PKU). This type of therapy is advantageous because it is easily regulated through established protein expression systems. One company, Synlogic, has developed an AGT candidate that uses a bacterial vector to treat PKU. Read More
New sensor-based test could lead to fast, cheap antibiotic susceptibility testing
Scientists have developed a new method for monitoring bacterial responses to antibiotics that could enable personalized antibiotic therapies. The test uses sensors to reduce time and costs while increasing the portability for antibiotic susceptibility testing of patient samples. The results of the study were published recently in Scientific Reports. Read More
Researchers fight drug-resistant bacteria with antibiotic 'Trojan horse'
In the latest chapter of the arms race between scientists and drug-resistant bacteria, scientists have devised an antibiotic-filled "Trojan horse" that penetrates deep into the patient's target tissues before unleashing an antibiotic payload on unsuspecting bacterial invaders. The methodology was described July 19 in eLife. Read More
Conferences
Cell & Gene Meeting on the Mesa
October 11-13
Carlsbad, California United States
IDWeek 2022
October 19-23
District of Columbia United States
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
October 25-29
Los Angeles, California United States
International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Annual Meeting
October 30 - November 2
Orlando, Florida United States
Connect
Science Advisory Board on LinkedIn
Science Advisory Board on Facebook
Science Advisory Board on Twitter