Cell Biology
Detecting HPV in women is improved with the aid of a new molecular approach
A new technique called HPV RNA-Seq can provide a second-line test in HPV-positive patients to reduce unnecessary colposcopies and even be used as a two-in-one test combining HPV typing with triage capabilities. Researchers from Institut Pasteur and the Pathogen Discovery Laboratory in Paris, France published their findings in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics on August 12, 2019. Read More
Large-scale analysis of microbiome reveals new classes of small proteins with implications in drug discovery
Trillion of bacteria reside within our bodies, and scientists are just scratching the surface of understanding the microbiome. Researchers at Stanford School of Medicine have shed light on previously unidentified proteins that may have an important role in human health and advance drug development. Read More
Visualizing big data in the life sciences gets an upgrade with new software
A new software developed by researchers at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) uses algorithms to reconstruct and scale data acquired by light-sheet microscopy that renders a supercomputer unnecessary. Light microscopy techniques provide extremely detailed information but result in terabytes of data which is nearly impossible for scientists to process. MDC researchers are helping make sense of this data. Read More
Structure-based vaccine design may help save the lives of infants and children
A new experimental vaccine, utilizing structure-based design, shows promise in a phase I clinical trial. The vaccine will protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of infectious disease deaths in infants. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin published findings on Aug 2, 2019 in Science stating that one dose elicited increases in RSV-neutralizing antibodies over several months. Read More
Finding the next generation of antibiotics may require the use of NGS sequencing and genome mining
Determining how antibiotic structures are formed in nature is crucial knowledge that scientists will leverage in the development of the next generation of antibiotics. Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis and the University at Buffalo published the X-ray crystal structure of an enzyme that produces a candidate antibiotic in Nature Communications on July 31, 2019. Read More
Functionality of small protein determined - potential to develop new therapies for Parkinson’s disease
A small protein, alpha-synuclein, has been found to be associated with the prevention of Parkinson’s disease. Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University (OSHU) published results in the journal Scientific Reports on July 29, 2019 showing that alpha-synuclein has a role in repairing breaks in DNA. Read More
Profiling of gut microbiome now possible with new 3D printed pill
Researchers at Tufts University have designed an ingestible, biocompatible, battery-less, 3D-printed micro-engineered pill that will enable them to non-invasively profile bacterial species that could provide new insights into many gastrointestinal diseases. Read More
The European Commission pursues open science and why it’s important
Scientists believe that there is a reproducibility crisis in the scientific community where many scientists fail to reproduce experiments, according to a new report by Science | Business in July 2019. Open science is a high priority for the European Commission, with around 70% of all data generated by EU-funded programs being accessible to the public. Read More
Microbiome-directed therapeutic foods tackle childhood malnutrition
The results of two new reports, linking the growth of infants and children to healthy development of gut microbiomes, were published in Science on July 12th. Researchers utilized microbiome-directed complementary foods in an approach that focuses on selectively boosting key growth-promoting gut microbes using ingredients present in affordable, culturally acceptable foods. Read More
Landmark study explores public understanding of science and trust in scientific and medical professionals
Understanding global perceptions and knowledge of science is of growing interest to the scientific community. Organizations such as 3M, with their State of Science Index Survey and the Wellcome Global Monitor (WGM), from the Wellcome Foundation and Gallup World Poll, explore attitudes towards science and medicine, and also confidence in scientists themselves. Read More
Connect
Science Advisory Board on LinkedIn
Science Advisory Board on Facebook
Science Advisory Board on Twitter