Immunology
Leveraging optofluidics to make therapeutic antibody discovery easier
The need for speed and accuracy in the development of therapeutic antibodies has prompted Berkeley Lights to upgrade its optofluidic tools to help customers improve the quality of their therapeutic antibody products. John Proctor, PhD, senior vice president of antibody therapeutics at Berkeley Lights, spoke with ScienceBoard.net about some technological advancements the company has recently launched. Read More
Hope for next-gen COVID-19 vaccines may rest in an unexpected region of the virus
Researchers further elucidated how antibodies produced in people who effectively fight off SARS-CoV-2 work to neutralize the part of the virus responsible for causing infection. The study, published in Science on May 4, describes how antibodies targeting sections of the virus outside of the receptor-binding domain may be useful in the development of vaccines and therapies. Read More
How the South African SARS-CoV-2 variant evades antibodies
Computer modeling has demonstrated that one of the three mutations of the South African SARS-CoV-2 variant reduces its ability to bind to human cells. The results, published recently in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, also suggest that the mutation may help it escape some therapeutic antibodies. Read More
Naturally occurring molecule helps SARS-CoV-2 evade neutralizing antibodies
Researchers have identified naturally occurring molecules that are created from the breakdown of hemoglobin and block the binding of a subset of human antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. The discovery, published in Science Advances on April 22, may help explain why some COVID-19 patients can become severely ill despite having high levels of antibodies against the virus. Read More
Variant-resistant COVID-19 vaccines could be effective, cheap to make
Researchers have collaborated to create a new COVID-19 vaccine platform containing antigens against the fusion protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that could be effective against variants of the virus. The research was published online on April 15 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read More
Will preprints have a lasting effect on publishing beyond COVID-19?
During the COVID-19 pandemic, 25% of all COVID-19-related scientific manuscripts were shared on preprint servers, a steep increase from previous usage and relative to traditional peer-review journals. An international team of researchers explored the critical role of preprint servers in disseminating epidemic-related information in an article published in PLOS Biology on April 2. Read More
New method creates insights into T-cell responses to infections
Researchers have developed a method to study the specialization of T cells in the context of acute versus chronic infections. They found that T-cell responses can vary based on receptor signal strength and the persistence of infection in a study published in eLife on March 8. Read More
FDA committee gives nod to Janssen COVID-19 vaccine
A single-shot COVID-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson's Janssen Biotech subsidiary has received a positive recommendation from a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee. Should the FDA grant the product emergency use authorization, the vaccine candidate will become the third to be made available in the U.S. Read More
New open-access toolkit helps research labs study SARS-CoV-2
One of the most important factors in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic is large-scale scientific collaborations and knowledge sharing. One international group of researchers has made its simple, robust toolkit available to laboratories around the globe that are unaccustomed to working with coronaviruses. The details can be found in a PLOS Biology paper published on February 25. Read More
Clinical pipeline promises effective 2nd-generation COVID-19 vaccines
Despite the small number of COVID-19 vaccines that have been granted emergency use authorizations by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to date, many biopharmaceutical companies are continuing to push new vaccine candidates toward regulatory approval. The slow rollout of approved vaccines has created the need for second-generation products with the potential to accelerate the world's return to something approaching normalcy. Read More
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