Immunology
Why are children more resistant to SARS-CoV-2 infection?
Why do children seem to be more resistant to SARS-CoV-2 infection than adults? The answer may lie in the age-dependent presence of a key viral enzyme, transmembrane protease serine 2, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation on November 12. Read More
Moderna reports 94.5% efficacy for COVID-19 vaccine
A COVID-19 vaccine under development by Moderna had 94.5% efficacy in a phase III clinical trial, according to an independent data safety monitoring board that notified the company of the results. The news builds on positive sentiment that a solution to the COVID-19 pandemic could be around the corner. Read More
Why the most common SARS-CoV-2 strain spreads so easily
A new study confirms that the D614G mutant SARS-CoV-2 virus, which is now the most common form of the virus, is more easily transmitted among hosts but does not cause more severe disease than the original virus. The findings were published in Science on November 12. Read More
Can vaccine resistance be predicted with test samples?
The likelihood of SARS-CoV-2 developing resistance to COVID-19 vaccines currently under development can be determined using repurposed blood and nasal test samples that are already being collected as part of clinical trials, according to Pennsylvania State University researchers. The perspective piece was published in PLOS Biology on November 9. Read More
If successful, COVID-19 vaccines could be worth $27B
Vaccines are considered one of the most effective public health measures preventing diseases in the modern world. They could also be very profitable endeavors, according to a new report from Kalorama Information, which estimates the market for COVID-19 vaccines could be as high as $27 billion. Read More
Different immune response helps kids clear SARS-CoV-2 quickly
Why does the SARS-CoV-2 virus seem to have less of an impact on children than adults? A new study published November 5 in Nature Immunology investigates this question, finding that the immune systems of children respond differently to SARS-CoV-2 in a way that allows them to more easily clear the virus from their bodies. Read More
Synthetic nanobodies show potential for new COVID-19 therapies
Synthetic nanobodies may provide a practical avenue for the development of novel COVID-19 therapies compared to human antibodies, which are bulkier and require greater research investment. A study on synthetic nanobodies was conducted by a group of German researchers and published in Nature Communications on November 4. Read More
Effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines will rely on public trust
No matter how effective upcoming COVID-19 vaccines are, their ultimate success in combating the pandemic will depend on how much the public trusts the safety and efficacy of the products. That's according to a panel of physicians and scientists who discussed COVID-19 vaccine trials in a briefing on October 29. Read More
Most antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 are strong and long-lasting
How long does the immune response last in patients with the SARS-CoV-2 virus? This has been a key question in shaping the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and a new report published in Science on October 28 offers some good news. Read More
New model could improve vaccine, immunotherapy design
A new model used to predict the outcomes of pathogen detection systems as a function of innate immunity may lead to more effective cancer immunotherapies and vaccines against existing and novel pathogens, according to results published in Cell Systems on October 27. Read More
Conferences
Laboratory Products Association Annual Meeting
October 1-4
Scottsdale, Arizona United States
Cell & Gene Meeting on the Mesa
October 11-13
Carlsbad, California United States
IDWeek 2022
October 19-23
District of Columbia United States
American Society of Human Genetics Annual Meeting
October 25-29
Los Angeles, California United States
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