Drug Discovery & Development
Vaccine in development against hypervirulent Klebsiella
Concerns arising over the development of hypervirulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae have led researchers to develop an entirely new vaccine to protect against the gram-negative bacteria. A team of researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and VaxNewMo (a startup based in St. Louis) designed the vaccine by genetically manipulating E. coli. The details of the prototype designed were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on August 27th.  Discuss
Success of immunotherapies increased in cancer patients through co-treatment with monoclonal antibodies
A new approach provides evidence that it is possible to break down the protective wall surrounding tumor cells, therefore making immunotherapies more effective in patients with a variety of cancers. This research, funded by Cancer Research UK, was published in the EBioMedicine on August 25th.  Discuss
Oncogene identified as a therapeutic target for liver cancer
The function of an enzyme that is highly expressed in many cancers has been revealed to regulate key pathways in cancer metabolic adaptation. Researchers at the Georgia Cancer Center and Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University published their findings in Hepatology.  Discuss
New drug target identified for common brain cancer
Research led by the Cleveland Clinic has identified a potential new therapy in the treatment of glioblastoma. An article published in Cancer Discovery on August 21, identifies FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2), as a novel drug target for glioblastoma, the most common primary malignant brain tumor.  Discuss
Biologically active molecules in coal are found to have antiviral properties against tick-borne encephalitis
Scientists from Russia demonstrated in a Scientific Reports article published on August 19, that biologically active molecular components of substances extracted from coal, humic substances, have antiviral properties. A novel approach to identify these molecules determined that these molecules inhibit the reproduction of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), which causes clinically relevant human viral infectious disease.  Discuss
Top scientists ousted – potential impacts on mistrust of scientists in the US
Novartis dismissed the top two scientists at its gene therapy division shortly after CEO, Vas Narasimhan, learned of internal data falsification. This controversy comes at a time of high public trust in science and threatens to break that trust with scandals and safety concerns.  Discuss
The Parkinson’s Foundation launches large-scale genetic study, aiming to improve patient care and speed clinical trials
More than 10 million people worldwide are currently living with Parkinson’s disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder that impacts the dopamine-producing neurons in the brain. Scientists do not know exactly what causes PD, but they believe it is a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Nearly 10% to 15% of all PD cases are caused by genetic mutations. A new study aims to understand how the disease develops and how it can be treated or cured. This study, PD GENEration: Mapping the Future of Parkinson’s Disease is currently being conducted by the Parkinson’s Foundation.  Discuss
Large-scale analysis of microbiome reveals new classes of small proteins with implications in drug discovery
Trillion of bacteria reside within our bodies, and scientists are just scratching the surface of understanding the microbiome. Researchers at Stanford School of Medicine have shed light on previously unidentified proteins that may have an important role in human health and advance drug development.  Discuss
New immunotherapy moves further into clinical testing with promising results
Success in international clinical trials leads to U.S. based research organizations beginning phase I/II clinical trials. If this form of immunotherapy is successful and deemed safe, then it could save the lives of liver cancer patients across the world.  Discuss
Structure-based vaccine design may help save the lives of infants and children
A new experimental vaccine, utilizing structure-based design, shows promise in a phase I clinical trial. The vaccine will protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of infectious disease deaths in infants. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin published findings on Aug 2, 2019 in Science stating that one dose elicited increases in RSV-neutralizing antibodies over several months.  Discuss
Connect
Science Advisory Board on LinkedIn
Science Advisory Board on Facebook
Science Advisory Board on Twitter