Omega Therapeutics advances epigenomic programming platform

By The Science Advisory Board staff writers

July 29, 2020 -- Omega Therapeutics has received $85 million in financing to support clinical trials of its epigenomic controllers for programs in oncology, inflammation, autoimmune, metabolic, and rare genetic diseases.

The company's epigenomic programming platform selectively directs the human genome to treat and cure disease by precisely controlling genomic expression without altering native nucleic acid sequences. The platform modulates insulated genomic domains to up- or down-regulate single or multiple genes simultaneously.

The company calls the genomic modulators "epigenomic controllers," and said they are engineered to precisely tune genomic activity with high target specificity and durability. They are composed of a DNA-binding domain and an epigenetic effector domain delivered as messenger RNA which modulate gene expression, according to the firm.


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