Canbridge, UMass partner on gene therapies for neuromuscular diseases

By The Science Advisory Board staff writers

September 9, 2020 -- Canbridge Pharmaceuticals has expanded its gene-therapy partnership with the University of Massachusetts (UMass) Medical School.

Under the direction of Miguel Sena-Esteves, PhD, of UMass, the second sponsored program between Canbridge and the university will focus on the development of customized adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors with broad applications for treating neuromuscular diseases, according to the company.

The new collaboration follows an agreement earlier this year to study gene therapy-based treatments with Guangping Gao, PhD, director of UMass Medical School's Horae Gene Therapy Center.

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