Human Diseases

Study shows that Huntington's disease can be slowed by modifying brain cells
A new study led by researchers at UCLA published in Science Translational Medicine on October 16 found that Huntington's disease (HD) damages astrocytes at the early stages of the disease, contributing to neuropsychiatric symptoms.  Discuss
Dementia-associated atrophy predicted by brain networks
A new study uses brain maps to predict how brain atrophy spreads in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The experiment, conducted by UC San Francisco scientists, adds to a growing body of data suggesting that brain cell loss associated with dementia spreads via synaptic connections between established brain networks.  Discuss
New bio-imaging techniques help scientists understand the early stages of Parkinson's disease
Scientists observed, for the first time ever, how variants of Parkinson's disease-associated protein alpha-synuclein change over time and identify the initial stages of protein aggregates. A new study published in Nature Communications on October 10 helps to clarify the why treatment challenges associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), when does it begin.  Discuss
New molecular cause identified for neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease
A collaborative research effort uncovered evidence for a new molecular basis for neurodegeneration seen in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital published the study in Cell Reports on October 8.  Discuss
Large-scale study finds genetic variant responsible for detrimental immune response to common anti-inflammatory drugs
Researchers in the UK seek to understand why commonly used medication fails to treat Chron's disease by identifying a new genetic marker. The research published in Gastroenterology on October 7, identified a genetic variation that decreases the efficiency of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs.
Protein receptors imaged by cryoelectron microscopy help scientists understand inflammation
Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University used cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) to observe protein structure and function at a molecular level. This discovery, published in Cell on October 3 describes the structure of P2X receptor, a cellular membrane protein receptor, and provides insight into how the cation channel functions.  Discuss
Forward-oriented gene therapy improves treatment for sickle cell disease
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have developed a new and improved viral vector that is up to 10 times more efficient at incorporating corrective genes into bone marrow stem cells than conventional treatments. The work was published in Nature Communications on October 2, and was supported by the National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the NIH.  Discuss
Understanding bacterial motility using cryogenic electron microscopy
A new finding reported in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology on October 1 shows how bacterial transmit motion from an inner motor to an outer tail through a flexible joint in the flagellum. This hook helps researchers understand how bacteria move and allows them to improve therapies against bacterial infections.  Discuss
Form-switching bacteria may cause antibiotic resistance
For the first time, scientists have confirmed that bacteria can change forms to avoid being targeted by antibiotics in the human body. Researchers from Newcastle University used state-of-the-art technology to identify bacteria with this unique characteristic. They show, in a study published in Nature Communications on September 26, that these bacteria can survive without a cell wall, potentially leading to antibiotic resistance.  Discuss
Super-resolution imaging characterizes individual synaptic proteins
It is now possible to rapidly image synaptic proteins at high-resolution thanks to a new technique developed by researchers at MIT and the Broad Institute of Harvard. Details of the technique which use fluorescent nucleic acid probes to label different proteins are described the September 26 Nature Communications article.  Discuss
Conferences
Virology, Emerging Diseases & Vaccines
October 21-22
Amsterdam Netherlands
10th CNS Summit
October 31 - November 3
Boca Raton, Florida United States
11th Annual PEGS Europe
November 18-22
Lisbon Portugal
Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics
December 9-13
San Diego, California United States
Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS) 2020
January 25-29, 2020
San Diego, California United States
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