Cancer & Disease Research
Discovery of widespread DNA damage in stem cell lines spurs call for pre-use sequencing
More than 70% of stem cell lines derived from human skin cells have damage to their DNA that could compromise their use in research and cell-based therapies, according to a study published August 11 in Nature Genetics. Read More
Repurposed drug shows promise in animal studies as potential therapy for ALS
A drug used to treat enlarged prostates and high blood pressure could help to slow the progression of motor neuron disease, which is also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Read More
Nanoparticles protect mice from blood vessel rupture, offers potential therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysms in humans
Administration of small interfering RNA nanoparticles has protected mice from sudden death due to the rupture of a major blood vessel in the abdomen, setting the stage for research that could ultimately enable treatment for people at risk of life-threatening abdominal aortic aneurysm. Read More
Preclinical data on long-acting tuberculosis drug raises hopes for simplified treatment
A long-acting injectable formulation of rifabutin has delivered high plasma concentrations for 16 weeks in mice, resulting in the prevention of tuberculosis and the clearing of the pathogen from the lungs. Read More
Hydrogel proves to be immunity-boosting postoperative treatment in mouse models of human glioblastoma
A new injectable hydrogel developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers has been successfully used as an immunity-boosting postoperative treatment in mouse models of human glioblastoma, one of the most complex, deadly, and treatment-resistant cancers that begin within the brain. Read More
NIH team creates 3D structure of twinkle protein, sheds light on mitochondrial diseases
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have used cryo-electron microscopy and other techniques to create a 3D structure of the twinkle protein, the final piece of the human minimal mitochondrial replisome to be structurally characterized. Read More
Molecular, genetic mechanisms of microglia predispose individuals to Alzheimer's: study
Mount Sinai researchers contend they have achieved an “unprecedented” understanding of the genetic and molecular mechanisms in human microglia, immune cells that reside in the brain, providing insights into how they contribute to the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Read More
Link between genes, mitochondrial DNA reveals way to tackle cardiovascular disease
The discovery of a link between mitochondria, inflammation, and a pair of genes that help regulate blood cell growth has revealed a potential new target for atherosclerosis therapies. Read More
First full map of immune system connections unlocks drug discovery opportunities
Researchers have created the first full map of immune system connections showing how immune cells communicate, pointing to ways to modulate the pathways to treat cancer and infectious diseases. Read More
Technology restores cell, organ function in pigs an hour after their deaths
Yale University scientists were able to restore blood circulation and other cellular functions in pigs a full hour after their deaths from cardiac arrest by using technology that delivers a specially designed cell-protective fluid to organs and tissues, according to a paper published August 3 in the journal Nature. Read More
Conferences
Glasgow International Health Festival
August 24-27
Glasgow, Glasgow City United Kingdom
Pharma Competitive Intelligence Conference and Exhibition
September 21-22
Newark, New Jersey United States
BioProcess International (BPI) Conference
September 27-30
Boston, Massachusetts United States
Laboratory Products Association Annual Meeting
October 1-4
Scottsdale, Arizona United States
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