Proteomics Sponsored by Bio-Rad
Immune cells shown to kill MRSA before it enters the body
Neutrophils could be responsible for controlling bacterial numbers of an antibiotic-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human skin before the bacteria get a chance to invade, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in Cell Reports on October 29. Read More
New insights into why tumor suppressor proteins go awry in cancer
Researchers from Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City, MO have identified proteins that are involved in tumor growth and metastasis in many cancers such as breast cancer. The research was published in Science Advances on October 23. Read More
Scientists build a better brain map
Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory published a new study in Cell, on October 17, that introduces barcoded anatomy resolved by sequencing (BARseq), the next generation of MAPseq. Read More
Study shows that Huntington's disease can be slowed by modifying brain cells
A new study led by researchers at UCLA published in Science Translational Medicine on October 16 found that Huntington's disease (HD) damages astrocytes at the early stages of the disease, contributing to neuropsychiatric symptoms. Read More
New CRISPR Cas13 system offers powerful antiviral protection
A first-of-its-kind study conducted by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard demonstrates that Cas13, a class 2 CRISPR system, can be used as an antiviral in cultured human cells. The research, published in Molecular Cell on October 10, suggests that the RNA-cutting enzyme can be programmed to detect and destroy RNA-based viruses. Read More
New molecular cause identified for neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease
A collaborative research effort uncovered evidence for a new molecular basis for neurodegeneration seen in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital published the study in Cell Reports on October 8. Read More
New research suggests circular RNAs are important for cardiac healing
Researchers from the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University describe how circular RNA fills a critical role during tissue repair after heart attacks, due to a unique ability to absorb harmful molecules. The study was published September 20 in Nature Communications. Read More
Breakthrough electrochemical technique may bring cost savings to drug companies
Researchers have developed a simple new method for the creation of hindered ether compounds, which are often important components of many drugs and commercial products. Hindered ethers have been traditionally difficult to manufacture, but scientists at Scripps Research have published a new electrochemistry technique in Nature on September 9, which allows these compounds to be produced faster and more efficiently. Read More
New populations of lung cells identified which could aid in the treatment of chronic respiratory diseases
New research confirms the existence of two new subpopulations interstitial macrophages (IM), which are crucial to the pulmonary immune system. Published in Nature Communications on August 3, researchers from the Immunophysiology Laboratory of the GIGA Institute at the University of Liege provide insights into the characterization of these IM. Read More
Vaccine in development against hypervirulent Klebsiella
Concerns arising over the development of hypervirulent strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae have led researchers to develop an entirely new vaccine to protect against the gram-negative bacteria. A team of researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and VaxNewMo (a startup based in St. Louis) designed the vaccine by genetically manipulating E. coli. The details of the prototype designed were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on August 27th. Read More
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