Immunology
New study finds SARS-CoV-2 antibodies disappear quickly
Antibodies that develop after infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus disappear quickly, according to an analysis published in Science Immunology on December 7. The findings could indicate that SARS-CoV-2 infection might not offer long-term immunity from subsequent reinfection with the virus. Read More
New universal flu vaccine targets conserved region of viral surface protein
A new universal influenza vaccine has been developed that targets the stalk portion of the influenza virus surface protein rather than the head portion. This vaccine, which is capable of neutralizing diverse strains of influenza, was evaluated in a phase I clinical study whose results were published in Nature Medicine on December 7. Read More
Study unravels why children are more protected from SARS-CoV-2 infection
One of the more puzzling aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic is the resistance of children to the negative effects of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. A new study published December 1 in Archives of Disease in Childhood indicates that this resistance may be due to differences in the immune system, certain blood vessel characteristics, and microbiota composition in children. Read More
What are the unresolved questions about SARS-CoV-2 T-cell responses?
Researchers have shed light on the "known unknowns" of preexisting and acquired T-cell responses in relation to SARS-CoV-2 infection. In a perspective piece, published in Science Immunology on November 18, scientists from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden discuss the role and durability of T-cell responses in COVID-19. Read More
Different immune response helps kids clear SARS-CoV-2 quickly
Why does the SARS-CoV-2 virus seem to have less of an impact on children than adults? A new study published November 5 in Nature Immunology investigates this question, finding that the immune systems of children respond differently to SARS-CoV-2 in a way that allows them to more easily clear the virus from their bodies. Read More
Synthetic nanobodies show potential for new COVID-19 therapies
Synthetic nanobodies may provide a practical avenue for the development of novel COVID-19 therapies compared to human antibodies, which are bulkier and require greater research investment. A study on synthetic nanobodies was conducted by a group of German researchers and published in Nature Communications on November 4. Read More
Effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines will rely on public trust
No matter how effective upcoming COVID-19 vaccines are, their ultimate success in combating the pandemic will depend on how much the public trusts the safety and efficacy of the products. That's according to a panel of physicians and scientists who discussed COVID-19 vaccine trials in a briefing on October 29. Read More
Most antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 are strong and long-lasting
How long does the immune response last in patients with the SARS-CoV-2 virus? This has been a key question in shaping the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and a new report published in Science on October 28 offers some good news. Read More
New COVID-19 immunogen could help with early diagnosis
A new assay that detects the unique SARS-CoV-2 orf8 protein in the sera of COVID-19 patients in the early stage of the infection is a strategic step in controlling the COVID-19 pandemic, according to research published online October 20 in mBio. Read More
Can SARS-CoV antibodies be used to develop universal coronavirus vaccines?
Can antibodies developed against SARS-CoV during the 2003 outbreak be used to prevent infection by SARS-CoV-2? In an October 9 study published in Science Advances, researchers analyzed precious serum collected from convalescent SARS-CoV patients to find out. Read More
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