Drug Discovery & Development
Novel enzyme structure discovered by scientists
A research team at the University of California, Riverside, has discovered the structure of a novel RNA-modifying enzyme and identified the mechanism that controls substrate specificity. The study was published in Nature Communications on November 6 and explains how protein machinery in cells is regulated to target RNA molecules for modification. Read More
Software improves the speed of identifying potential new antibiotics
Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University and seven other institutions developed a software tool that can play a high-speed "Match Game" to identify bioactive molecules and microbial genes that produce them so they can be evaluated as new antibiotics and other therapeutic agents. This work was published in Cell Systems on October 16. Read More
Large-scale study finds genetic variant responsible for detrimental immune response to common anti-inflammatory drugs
Researchers in the UK seek to understand why commonly used medication fails to treat Chron's disease by identifying a new genetic marker. The research published in Gastroenterology on October 7, identified a genetic variation that decreases the efficiency of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs. Read More
Protein receptors imaged by cryoelectron microscopy help scientists understand inflammation
Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University used cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) to observe protein structure and function at a molecular level. This discovery, published in Cell on October 3 describes the structure of P2X receptor, a cellular membrane protein receptor, and provides insight into how the cation channel functions. Read More
Driven by nanotech and other micro technologies electron microscopy market continues to grow
According to a new report from Strategic Directions International (SDI), the total market for electron microscopy instrumentation was in excess of $2.5 billion in 2018 and is expected to reach nearly $3.4 billion by 2023. Read More
Personalized cancer vaccines now possible due to discovery of cancer frameshift neoantigens
Researchers from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute demonstrated experimental proof-of-concept that cancer mutations produce individual neoantigens, or newly formed antigens, and can be used for cancer vaccines. The new paper published in Scientific Reports on October 2, shows that neoantigens can be used to protect against cancer. Read More
Form-switching bacteria may cause antibiotic resistance
For the first time, scientists have confirmed that bacteria can change forms to avoid being targeted by antibiotics in the human body. Researchers from Newcastle University used state-of-the-art technology to identify bacteria with this unique characteristic. They show, in a study published in Nature Communications on September 26, that these bacteria can survive without a cell wall, potentially leading to antibiotic resistance. Read More
New synthetic vaccine fights infectious disease with assistance from the data cloud
A new synthetic vaccine developed by researchers at the University of Bristol and the French National Centre for Scientific Research can be stored at warmer temperatures due to an engineered scaffold design. The details of the Chikungunya vaccine candidate are published in Science Advances on September 25. Read More
New research helps scientists understand the genetic cause of immune disease
Research published in Nature Genetics on September 23 helps narrow down the search for molecular drivers for immune disease which could result in the identification of new drug targets and development of new therapies illnesses such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, and arthritis. Read More
Conferences
Bio-IT World Conference and Expo
September 20-22
Boston, Massachusetts United States
BioProcess International
September 20-23
Boston, Massachusetts United States
Cell and Gene Therapy Manufacturing and Commercialization
September 20-23
Boston, Massachusetts United States
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