Cell Biology
Form-switching bacteria may cause antibiotic resistance
For the first time, scientists have confirmed that bacteria can change forms to avoid being targeted by antibiotics in the human body. Researchers from Newcastle University used state-of-the-art technology to identify bacteria with this unique characteristic. They show, in a study published in Nature Communications on September 26, that these bacteria can survive without a cell wall, potentially leading to antibiotic resistance.  Discuss
Genomic and microbial analyses reveal microbe independently degrades oil to gas
Methanoliparia, an archaea found in deep within oil reservoirs, may degrade oil to methane all by itself. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany and the MARUM, Centre for Marine Environmental Sciences provide genomic and microbial evidence of Methanoliparia’s ability to transform long-chain hydrocarbons to methane. The results were published in mBio on August, 20.  Discuss
Large-scale analysis of microbiome reveals new classes of small proteins with implications in drug discovery
Trillion of bacteria reside within our bodies, and scientists are just scratching the surface of understanding the microbiome. Researchers at Stanford School of Medicine have shed light on previously unidentified proteins that may have an important role in human health and advance drug development.  Discuss
Finding the next generation of antibiotics may require the use of NGS sequencing and genome mining
Determining how antibiotic structures are formed in nature is crucial knowledge that scientists will leverage in the development of the next generation of antibiotics. Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis and the University at Buffalo published the X-ray crystal structure of an enzyme that produces a candidate antibiotic in Nature Communications on July 31, 2019.  Discuss
Profiling of gut microbiome now possible with new 3D printed pill
Researchers at Tufts University have designed an ingestible, biocompatible, battery-less, 3D-printed micro-engineered pill that will enable them to non-invasively profile bacterial species that could provide new insights into many gastrointestinal diseases.  Discuss
The European Commission pursues open science and why it’s important
Scientists believe that there is a reproducibility crisis in the scientific community where many scientists fail to reproduce experiments, according to a new report by Science | Business in July 2019. Open science is a high priority for the European Commission, with around 70% of all data generated by EU-funded programs being accessible to the public.  Discuss
Microbiome-directed therapeutic foods tackle childhood malnutrition
The results of two new reports, linking the growth of infants and children to healthy development of gut microbiomes, were published in Science on July 12th. Researchers utilized microbiome-directed complementary foods in an approach that focuses on selectively boosting key growth-promoting gut microbes using ingredients present in affordable, culturally acceptable foods.  Discuss
Landmark study explores public understanding of science and trust in scientific and medical professionals
Understanding global perceptions and knowledge of science is of growing interest to the scientific community. Organizations such as 3M, with their State of Science Index Survey and the Wellcome Global Monitor (WGM), from the Wellcome Foundation and Gallup World Poll, explore attitudes towards science and medicine, and also confidence in scientists themselves.  Discuss
Leaders in science and engineering publications over the last decade: China and the US
Capturing the attention of policy makers and companies serving the academic research market the countries with the largest number of science and engineering (S&E) articles has significantly evolved between 2007 and 2017. China leads the list in 2017 followed by the US, a reverse from 2007, according to a May report from the NSF’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics.  Discuss
The National Institutes of Health launches the Symptom Science Center
The National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH NINR) launched the Symptom Science Center on June 27th, 2019 at the NIH Campus in Bethesda, MD. This event, attended by over 500 individuals, marks a momentous occasion for both clinical and translational multidisciplinary research.  Discuss
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