Cell Biology
Bacteria survive by possessing multiple genes to uptake the same amino acid
Researchers have long known that the uptake systems in clonal cells can differ based on their environments. Scientists reported their observations of this amino acid uptake pathway in bacteria for the first time in a new study published March 5 in Nature Communications.  Discuss
Artificial intelligence helps researchers find new antibiotics
To address antibiotic resistance, researchers have developed a machine-learning approach that can search millions of known chemicals to find new potential antimicrobial compounds. This research, published in Cell on February 20, uncovered several promising antibiotic candidates that will move into clinical testing.  Discuss
Genetically engineered probiotics successfully deliver immunotherapies
A new technology enables genetically engineered probiotic bacteria to be used as an efficacious, stable, and safe platform to deliver immunotherapies directly into a variety of tumors in just a single dose. The research was published online on February 12 in Science Translational Medicine.  Discuss
Phages containing huge amounts of DNA are found around the globe
An inventory of over 350 DNA sequences from phage genomes revealed that these genomes can be over 200,000 base pairs in length and found the largest phage genome ever described at 735,000 base pairs in length. The report published in Nature on February 12, evaluated the prevalence, diversity and ecosystem distribution of phages with large genomes.  Discuss
T cells work as a team to fight infection
Immune cells may be better at sensing each other than previously thought, according to a new study published in Immunity on February 11. Researchers from Germany, the Netherlands, and the U.K. revealed a mechanism T cells use to work as a team and mutually determine how to fight infections.  Discuss
Hydrogels enable on-demand production of pharmaceuticals
A first-in-class system that effectively embeds engineered microbes into the solid support of a 3D-printed hydrogel is described in a report published in Nature Communications on February 4. The hydrogel system organizes both individual microbes and groups of microbes for on-demand production of pharmaceuticals.  Discuss
Yeast metabolism may offer lessons on starving cancer cells
Scientists may have found a new way to starve cancer cells by learning from growth regulation mechanisms employed by yeast. They found that the same metabolic mechanism used by yeast to respond to nutrient shortages is also employed by mammalian cells -- a finding that could lead to new cancer therapies, according to a new study published in Nature Metabolism on January 20.  Discuss
Research sheds light on how bacteria 'take one for the team'
It's already known that bacteria under assault by phages can occasionally program themselves to die before they become infected. But a pair of new papers published January 10 in Molecular Cell sheds more light on the process by which bacteria "take one for the team." The findings could provide new avenues in the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.  Discuss
Scientists in the Lab: Featuring Nicole Lindor
ScienceBoard is happy to continue to feature scientists in the lab this month. The next scientist we are featuring is Nicole Lindor, a doctoral candidate at North Carolina State University.  Discuss
Bacterial evolution reveals method to fight antibacterial resistance
Different types of bacteria have evolved to develop unique mechanisms for achieving the same antibacterial function -- a finding that could lead to new ways to combat antibacterial resistance, according to scientists from Trinity College Dublin. They tested their findings using methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a study that was published in Nature Communications on January 9.  Discuss
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