Cancer & Disease Research Sponsored by Beckman Coulter
Scientists develop a first-of-its-kind in vitro 3D neural tissue model
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have successfully used stem cells to engineer nerve tissues as 3D models of neural networks to study brain function. The work was published in the December 3 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  Discuss
Scientists identify chaperones as potential therapies for Parkinson's disease
Researchers from the University of Basel have identified the malfunctional relationship and master regulatory mechanisms between chaperone proteins and α-Synuclein occurring in Parkinson's disease. The findings were published in Nature on December 4.  Discuss
Scientists build artificial neurons to cure chronic disease
Scientists from the University of Bath have achieved a first-of-its-kind artificial neuron on a silicon chip that behaves like a real biological neuron. The technology, published on December 3 in Nature Communications, is intended to cure chronic diseases, such as heart failure or Alzheimer's disease.  Discuss
New genetic risk factor discovered for Alzheimer's disease
A new genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) has been identified by researchers from the University of Kentucky. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Neuropathology & Experimental Neurology on November 21.  Discuss
New molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease identified
A group of researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered new molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease (PD) and subsequently determined how they impact the function of genes involved in the disease. This was accomplished using a complex statistical technique called multiscale gene network analysis (MGNA). The results were published in Nature Communications on November 20.  Discuss
Novel mitochondrial phenomenon helps explains early neurodegeneration
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine scientists discovered a novel pathway that leads to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study was published in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience on November 7. The pathway could explain the development of early stages of neurodegeneration which affects voluntary muscle movement such as walking and talking.  Discuss
Night gardeners: Microglia involved in brain plasticity during sleep
Research from the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) suggests that specific immune cells called microglia – which play a crucial role in reorganizing connections between nerve cells, fighting infection, and repairing damage – are primarily active during sleep. The research, conducted on mouse models, was published in Nature Neuroscience on October 21.  Discuss
Study shows that Huntington's disease can be slowed by modifying brain cells
A new study led by researchers at UCLA published in Science Translational Medicine on October 16 found that Huntington's disease (HD) damages astrocytes at the early stages of the disease, contributing to neuropsychiatric symptoms.  Discuss
Dementia-associated atrophy predicted by brain networks
A new study uses brain maps to predict how brain atrophy spreads in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The experiment, conducted by UC San Francisco scientists, adds to a growing body of data suggesting that brain cell loss associated with dementia spreads via synaptic connections between established brain networks.  Discuss
New bio-imaging techniques help scientists understand the early stages of Parkinson's disease
Scientists observed, for the first time ever, how variants of Parkinson's disease-associated protein alpha-synuclein change over time and identify the initial stages of protein aggregates. A new study published in Nature Communications on October 10 helps to clarify the why treatment challenges associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), when does it begin.  Discuss
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