Cancer & Disease Research
New bio-imaging techniques help scientists understand the early stages of Parkinson's disease
Scientists observed, for the first time ever, how variants of Parkinson's disease-associated protein alpha-synuclein change over time and identify the initial stages of protein aggregates. A new study published in Nature Communications on October 10 helps to clarify the why treatment challenges associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), when does it begin. Read More
New molecular cause identified for neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease
A collaborative research effort uncovered evidence for a new molecular basis for neurodegeneration seen in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children's Hospital published the study in Cell Reports on October 8. Read More
Forward-oriented gene therapy improves treatment for sickle cell disease
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have developed a new and improved viral vector that is up to 10 times more efficient at incorporating corrective genes into bone marrow stem cells than conventional treatments. The work was published in Nature Communications on October 2, and was supported by the National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the NIH. Read More
Personalized cancer vaccines now possible due to discovery of cancer frameshift neoantigens
Researchers from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute demonstrated experimental proof-of-concept that cancer mutations produce individual neoantigens, or newly formed antigens, and can be used for cancer vaccines. The new paper published in Scientific Reports on October 2, shows that neoantigens can be used to protect against cancer. Read More
Form-switching bacteria may cause antibiotic resistance
For the first time, scientists have confirmed that bacteria can change forms to avoid being targeted by antibiotics in the human body. Researchers from Newcastle University used state-of-the-art technology to identify bacteria with this unique characteristic. They show, in a study published in Nature Communications on September 26, that these bacteria can survive without a cell wall, potentially leading to antibiotic resistance. Read More
Super-resolution imaging characterizes individual synaptic proteins
It is now possible to rapidly image synaptic proteins at high-resolution thanks to a new technique developed by researchers at MIT and the Broad Institute of Harvard. Details of the technique which use fluorescent nucleic acid probes to label different proteins are described the September 26 Nature Communications article. Read More
New synthetic vaccine fights infectious disease with assistance from the data cloud
A new synthetic vaccine developed by researchers at the University of Bristol and the French National Centre for Scientific Research can be stored at warmer temperatures due to an engineered scaffold design. The details of the Chikungunya vaccine candidate are published in Science Advances on September 25. Read More
New research suggests circular RNAs are important for cardiac healing
Researchers from the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University describe how circular RNA fills a critical role during tissue repair after heart attacks, due to a unique ability to absorb harmful molecules. The study was published September 20 in Nature Communications. Read More
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September 20-23
Boston, Massachusetts United States
Cell and Gene Therapy Manufacturing and Commercialization
September 20-23
Boston, Massachusetts United States
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