Cancer & Disease Research Sponsored by Beckman Coulter
Neanderthal heritage may be a risk factor for COVID-19
A new study shows that a genetic risk factor inherited from Neanderthal heritage is associated with two times greater risk of serious disease and death from COVID-19. The study was published in Nature on September 30.  Discuss
RNA targeting could prevent replication of SARS-CoV-2 virus
What if you could stop the SARS-CoV-2 virus from reproducing itself? Researchers from Florida hope to do just that by creating a compound that targets and binds to RNA regions on the SARS-CoV-2 genome and disrupts its replication. The research was described in a September 30 article published in ACS Central Science.  Discuss
Science and scientists held in high esteem across the globe
An international survey conducted by the Pew Research Center found that scientists and their research are widely viewed in a positive light across global publics and many believe that government investments in research benefit society.  Discuss
Specialized T cells have unique role in severe COVID-19 cases
An unconventional subset of T cells may be strongly activated in patients with severe cases of COVID-19, according to a new study published in Science Immunology on September 28. This finding may lead to a new understanding of how the immune system responds to SARS-CoV-2 infection.  Discuss
COVID-19 concerns may undermine vaccine rates for seasonal flu
Only a third of parents believe that the flu vaccine will be more important this year, and 1 in 7 parents will not vaccinate their child due to concerns about COVID-19, according to the results of a new poll. The poll results underscore concerns that there could be a double impact of seasonal flu and COVID-19 this winter.  Discuss
Passive vaccines with mAbs may be effective for COVID-19
Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from the blood of recovered COVID-19 patients -- known colloquially as "convalescent plasma" -- could be potentially useful as therapeutic and prophylactic agents for passive vaccination, assuming their administration does not trigger unwanted side effects. The findings of the new study were published in Cell on September 26.  Discuss
Is 'bespoke' therapy the future of genomic medicine?
Gene therapies hold extremely exciting promise for meeting the unmet needs of many individuals with genetic diseases, as discussed in a session of the second annual American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Policy Summit on September 24.  Discuss
Science serves society, a crucial concept for gene therapy governance
With a focus on science and society, the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Policy Summit commenced on September 24. The ensuing discussion revealed how far science has advanced in a short period of time, and how the scientific community is rising to the challenge of gaining public buy-in for gene therapy.  Discuss
Are people in your state getting vaccinated?
Support for a COVID-19 vaccine continues to wane even as companies report being closer to bringing one to the public. This may not be surprising, considering people in many U.S. states don't get inoculated for other diseases such as polio and the flu.  Discuss
SARS-CoV-2 transcriptional patterns provide new insights into infection
New web resources provide insights into cellular genes that are impacted by coronavirus infection in the context of host molecular signaling pathways. These insights have the potential to speed novel drug development efforts in the fight against COVID-19, according to a new paper published in Scientific Data on September 22.  Discuss
Conferences
Festival of Genomics & Biodata
January 28-29, 2021
London, Greater London United Kingdom
Lab of the Future USA
May 11-12, 2021
Boston, Massachusetts United States
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