Bioimaging & Microscopy
Scientists alter cell function with genetic engineering, polymer science
A new method called genetically targeted chemical assembly (GTCA) has demonstrated the ability to build artificial structures within the body to carry out unique functions. The research, presented in the latest edition of Science, provides compelling evidence for GTCA's ability to modify cell function with bioengineering tools.  Discuss
Cryo-EM sheds light on ion channel regulation
A long-standing hypothesis about the regulation of ion channels has been confirmed by cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) imaging. The research presented in Nature on March 18 advances the basic understanding of key cellular processes that can be leveraged for a number of therapeutic and research applications.  Discuss
New biocompatible microparticles created with heat, light
A new simple and scalable protein-processing technique based on temperature-sensitive phase changes creates unique microarchitectures within microparticles for use in drug delivery and other bioengineering applications, according to a study published in Nature Communications on March 12.  Discuss
Atomic structures revealed by cryo-EM may lead to new antiviral drugs
Using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), researchers found unique structures of paramyxoviruses that can lead to a better understanding of viral replication, which in turn can be leveraged to develop improved antiviral drugs. The details were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on February 17.  Discuss
Microscopy with fluorescent tags gives high-def view of diabetes-related proteins
Leveraging the power of new imaging techniques, scientists are using unique fluorescent tags in combination with superresolution microscopy to gain novel insights into a receptor that plays a key role in controlling blood sugar levels. These insights will open the door to improved treatment options for type 2 diabetes.  Discuss
Correlative microscopy provides view of subcellular components
As technology improves and knowledge of molecular biology increases, there is a need to view and analyze the complex organization of cells. That's become possible thanks to a new methodology based on correlative microscopy, which uses a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy to seamlessly zoom in and out of a sample. The protocol was described in Science on January 17.  Discuss
Novel mitochondrial phenomenon helps explains early neurodegeneration
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine scientists discovered a novel pathway that leads to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study was published in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience on November 7. The pathway could explain the development of early stages of neurodegeneration which affects voluntary muscle movement such as walking and talking.  Discuss
Cutting edge microscopy technique leads to new insights in cancer
New research published in the October 31 edition of Science debuts a new technique for creating high-resolution visual maps of the chromatin structure remodeling (RSC) complex to further understand its role in healthy and cancer cells. This research was led by Bradley Cairn, PhD, cancer researcher at Huntsman Cancer Institute and professor and chair of oncological sciences at the University of Utah.  Discuss
New bio-imaging techniques help scientists understand the early stages of Parkinson's disease
Scientists observed, for the first time ever, how variants of Parkinson's disease-associated protein alpha-synuclein change over time and identify the initial stages of protein aggregates. A new study published in Nature Communications on October 10 helps to clarify the why treatment challenges associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), when does it begin.  Discuss
Protein receptors imaged by cryoelectron microscopy help scientists understand inflammation
Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University used cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) to observe protein structure and function at a molecular level. This discovery, published in Cell on October 3 describes the structure of P2X receptor, a cellular membrane protein receptor, and provides insight into how the cation channel functions.  Discuss
Conferences
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April 28 - May 1
Amsterdam, Noord-Holland Netherlands
Lab of the Future USA
May 19-20
Boston, Massachusetts United States
2nd Annual Cell Therapy Bioprocessing Conference
June 25-26
Boston, Massachusetts United States
BioProcess International
September 21-24
Boston, Massachusetts United States
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Conferences
BioProcess International Europe
April 28 - May 1
Amsterdam, Noord-Holland Netherlands
Lab of the Future USA
May 19-20
Boston, Massachusetts United States
2nd Annual Cell Therapy Bioprocessing Conference
June 25-26
Boston, Massachusetts United States
BioProcess International
September 21-24
Boston, Massachusetts United States
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